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Object ID 2008.12.04
Title Bruce, Margaret -- CCHS CHP Transcript
Object Name Oral History
Date 04/22/1987
Creator Chevy Chase Historical Society
Description Bruce, Margaret, April 22, 1987 - -Transcript of Interview with the Chevy Chase Historical Society Oral History Project

Interviewed by Mary Anne Tuohey and Marjorie Zapruder


For audio recording of interview see item 2008.11.04

Summary and Index of Terms
Written By: Alexander R. Parker
January 10th, 2012

Margaret Bruce moved, with her family, to Chevy Chase, Maryland in 1926, from Holly Oak, Delaware. She was the oldest of seven children, having one brother and five sisters. Her family originally immigrated to the United States from England during World War I. They moved around quite a bit at first, living in New York City, Jersey City, Baltimore, and Delaware. Margaret was already 18 when the family came to the United States, so she helped her mother and father raise her siblings. She eventually went to work for the Red Cross and did a great amount of volunteer work with the Presbyterian Church in Chevy Chase. Bruce began attending the local Methodist church in her adult years, and eventually converted.
Margaret Bruce's oral history interview is key in understanding the history of Chevy Chase during the mid-20th century. Her story recalls the rural nature of the area before World War II and how the neighborhoods developed quickly in the years after as more and more government workers came to live in Chevy Chase. She talks about the time of the street car and how the neighborhood was much more personable during those days. Bruce remembers the many small, local business establishments that dotted Chevy Chase around the middle of the 20th century, specifically a grocery store that delivered goods to one's home. She also gives an interesting impression of Chevy Chase during this time when she recalls changing from a Presbyterian to a Methodist Church because it was where all of her friends attended. Margaret talks about trips into downtown Washington, DC for bargain shopping days and to visit her father's office when she was a child. A very interesting final anecdote given by Mrs. Bruce was the fact that her father always locked their doors, even though it was the norm at the time to leave everything open. Margaret Bruce gives a candid and interesting interview here that is greatly important to understanding the history of Chevy Chase.

Index of Terms:

4H Club
Admiral John
Annapolis, Maryland
Avalon Theater, The
Babbington, Mrs.
Baltimore, Maryland
Battery Lane
Bethesda, Maryland
Bethesda Chevy Chase High School
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
Blessed Sacrament School
Bradley Lane
Broad Branch Road
Brook Farm Tea House
Brook Farm Flea Market
Brookville Market
Brookville Road
Bruce, Margaret
Central High School
Chevy Chase Circle
Chevy Chase Lake
Chevy Chase Methodist Church
Chevy Chase, DC
Chevy Chase, Maryland
Connecticut Avenue
Dart Drugstore
Delaware
Delaware Street
Earle, Charles
Earle, Ernest
Earle, Ernestine
Earle, Mrs.
East West Highway
England
F Street
Florida Avenue
Fulton Street
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Georgia Street
Gilbert, Joyce
Glasgow, Scotland
Govanstown
Greenville
High's Store
Holly Oak, Delaware
House of Commons
Ingomar Street
Japan
Jersey City, New Jersey
Jones, Mr.
Khruschev, Nakita
La Ferme
Lechler, Evelyn
Leibert, Dick
Leland Street
Levant, Babbington R.
Levant, Roberta
London, England
Lyerly, Ed
Magruders
Maryland
New York City, New York
Nordbeck, Beth
Pennsylvania
People's Drugstore
Potomac River
Presbyterian Church
Purple Iris
Raymond Street
Red Cross, The
Ritchie, Gordon
Rock Creek Park
Rosemary School
Rosemary Street
Russia
Safeway
San Francisco, California
Scotland
Section 3
Shapiros, The
Shepherd Street
Simpson, Elmer
Simpson, Lester
Sonnemann Grocery Store
Sparrow's Point
Spring Street
Tamagna, Dr. Irene
Tamagna, Ellen
Taylor Street
Temple, Shirley
Thomas, Alma
Thomas, Dorothy R. Levant
Thomas, Frank
Thomas, Marion
Thornapple Street
Tuohey, Mary Anne
Turner Lane
Voss, Perky
Waihoy, Bob
Washington Monument, The
Washington, DC
Western Avenue
Western High School
Willard Hotel
Woodward and Lothrop
World War I
Zapruder, Marjorie
Zuckermans, The